Beer Review: Southern Tier Old Man Winter

It never got above freezing today (and hasn’t for over a week now) and the wind is whipping something fierce. As a hater of the cold even on a good day, I was pretty properly miserable on my drive home, during which I had to stop and gas up my car. Shivering in a coat, hat, and gloves isn’t really my favorite thing. When I got home, I desperately needed something cozy to help me warm up.

Enter Southern Tier Old Man Winter, some manchego and salami, and some episodes of Critical Role (a D&D actual play stream, which I love, and which I am sadly almost caught up on – just in time for their new season). This is the kind of comfort that I needed this day.

Old Man Winter pours a handsome brunette color with a light cream colored, fine, smooth head that’s about one finger tall at its fullest. The head falls quickly enough, but leaves a bit of lacing behind when it does. It’s a good-looking beer. It smells warming to me, like brown sugar or honey. I’m not detecting any spices, but there is some depth and some richness to the malt profile.

The first taste is a little like a scotch ale and there’s some alcoholic heat to this. It’s 7.5%, so that’s no real surprise. It’s very balanced, inviting, rich, and just a hair sweet. Nice clean finish without any problematic dryness. It’s roasty like dark cocoa or maybe a touch of coffee – something just a hair bitter, but again, balanced.

A really enjoyable sipping beer for a winter’s night. Five out of five, and I’m so glad I bought a six pack to enjoy.

Beer Review: Southern Tier Pumpking

Look, I warned you that I like pumpkin beers. Get ready to read about a lot of them for a long, long time! I have fond memories of this beer, but it’s not really official until I review it here on Beerily Thus, right? Right. This is, luckily, not one of those unpleasant, tinny pumpkin ales. This is a robust pumpkin beer with lots to offer!

I had a 6oz of this at Beers and Cheers Too in Gaithersburg because even though I’d had a stressful Monday at work, it wasn’t so stressful that I felt like I needed twelve-to-sixteen ounces of an 8.6% ABV beer in the afternoon. Taako’s good out here.

Southern Tier Pumpking is a beautiful marigold color, which is appropriately autumnal in appearance. There’s a thin, pure white head with a little lacing, but this is an Imperial Ale and a lot of head isn’t necessarily something to expect. The clinginess of the lacing is likely due to a somewhat high sugar content; I remember this being a fairly sweet-tasting beer. It smells very warm, sort of peppercorny, but I’d bet that’s the allspice that I’m getting.

The first sip is alive with sweetness, warm spices, and rich pumpkin flavor. This is more like liquid pumpkin cake than many of its lackluster pumpkin beer cousins. It warms my tongue and the back of my throat. The taste of the spice blend stays on my tongue for a minute or two of quiet contemplation (I am of course meditating on how darn good pumpkin beers can be). It’s very easy to drink, which is dangerous because of that aforementioned high ABV. Enjoy, but watch out for it. It’ll bite you.

This is a seasonal treat that I look forward to every year and time hasn’t change that one bit. It’s as good as I remember, if not better. Five out of five, I’ll drink this for as long as I can find it.

 

Review: Southern Tier Porter

Sometimes, it’s nice to appreciate the simpler things in life. I’ll take a meyer lemon gose or a cardamom IPA or an espresso stout any day of the week and love that variety. But today, it’s back to basics: a simple, standard porter from Southern Tier. I love a good porter and was a loyal drinker of the style for many years. I’ve lately turned away from it and sought IPAs and more exotic beers – but today, I’ll return to my roots and put my fate in the hands of Southern Tier, a brewery that I’ve generally liked in the past.

Again, this is what I get for experimenting with different tea towels as backgrounds.

Poured from a bottle into a pint glass, this is a beautiful, rich, dark brown with a slightly auburn tinge to it. No light seems to pass through it. It has just the tiniest head of a lovely cream color – a puff that dissipates very quickly. There’s a small trace of an island of foam left behind, but it’s not much. Perhaps I’ve been spoiled by some recent stouts and porters on nitro.

It smells roasty, like dark bread , dark chocolate, coffee, brown sugar, and raisin. It’s only 5.5% ABV, but it smells boozy to me. Maybe it’s that brown sugar and raisin smell that’s often associated with higher ABV dark beers and brandywines.

Honestly, the taste is really lacking the punch that the nose suggested there would be. It over-promises and vastly under-delivers. It’s a little watery and thin, as porters sometimes are (and which I do not care for). It’s not at all full-bodied in either flavor or in mouthfeel. It tastes the most like that raisiny booziness that I got off of the nose. There is some flavor from the dark, roasted malts, but it’s also distressingly thin. The carbonation is relatively low. And there’s something sticky about the texture.

It’s a fine enough beer, it’s very much signature of the style in many ways, but maybe it’s not the style for me any longer. I think I’d pass up this particular porter in the future. Three out of five mugs for me.

Beer Review: Southern Tier Old Man Winter

Winter. I do not like winter. Every year, as spring and summer and fall go by, I seem to overlook how bone-shakingly cold it gets. Absence makes the heart grow… forgetful? Winter always slaps me across the face and surprises me with the first cold snap of the year. Today, I had to stop for gas while driving home from work and it was so cold and so windy that I very much needed something to warm me up.

A snack of salami and manchego and a beer sound like just the right way to enjoy watching an episode of Critical Role (a web series that follows a group of voice actors in a Dungeons and Dragons campaign – yes, I am exactly that kind of a nerd). I opened up a Southern Tier Old Man Winter, a winter ale, and got nice and cozy with my heat turned way up and a blanket draped over my shoulders.

This beer is a handsome brunette color with a light cream colored head made of fine, smooth bubbles, which is about one finger tall at its highest. This falls quickly enough, but leaves a lot of lacing behind when it does. It’s a good-looking beer and it smells warming to me, like brown sugar or honey. I’m not detecting any spices, but there are smells that speak to a rich, malty characteristic.

The first taste is like a scotch ale and there’s some decent alcoholic heat to this beverage. Clocking in at 7.5% ABV, this should come as no surprise. Still, it’s very balanced and inviting and it’s just a hair sweet. There’s a nice, clean finish without any problematic dryness. It’s roasty like dark cocoa or perhaps just a touch coffee-ish; there’s something that’s a hair bitter, but – again – it is very well balanced.

This is a very enjoyable sipping beer for a cold winter’s night. I’m so glad I bought a six pack to enjoy this month. A definite five out of five.