Beer Review: Flying Dog K-9 Cruiser Winter Ale

It was a cold and exceptionally windy night and we haven’t had a whole ton of those yet this season, so I guess we were overdue. This outing to Frisco Taphouse before my writing critique group absolutely called for something warm and cozy and winter appropriate. Why, something at around 7% and on cask sounds like it’ll hit the spot. And with “winter” in the name, how could I go wrong?

In a rare stroke of luck, this pour killed their cask a little shy of a full pint, so they were kind enough to put the drink on the house. Frisco is a good place in my mind and this is just another tick in the Why They’re Awesome column for me. I was happy to take my lucky beer and enjoy it.

It’s a handsome, deep brown hue with hints of ruddiness where light struggled to pass through at the outer edges of the glass. I imagine the head on this beer is all wrong because it was the end of a cask, so it seems silly to try to reflect on what the head is supposed to be like on this one. There are no spices in the nose, which I found a little surprising as that’s common in a lot of winter beers. There’s a strong scent of roasted malts, though, which I’m usually. Flying Dog K-9 Cruiser Winter Ale is apparently brewed with cardamom and vanilla, but I’m not smelling any of that – it just seems like a standard porter at a glance.

The taste is dry and has some richness that makes me thing of Scotch ale, but it’s not at all sweet. Not even a little bit. It’s cozy enough for winter, but it is also overwhelmingly dry to my palate. There’s some bitterness at work here that I’m finding very unappealing. I guess I’m doubly lucky that this was on the house since I’m not really loving it. It reads more like a disappointing porter to me than a winter ale.

It was fine, sure, but not at all what I was expecting and not something I will buy again. Just two out of five.

 

Five American Beers to Drink on July 4th

Cracking open a few beers sounds like an excellent way to celebrate that American classic, the Fourth of the July. Here’s a quick rundown of five interesting and refreshing beers made here in the good ol’ US of A.

21st Amendment Hell of High Watermelon

This strange (and strangely refreshing) wheat beer made with watermelon isn’t usually something I’d enjoy. I’ve had watermelon beers before, and often found them to have a sort of candy-like sweetness that was unpleasant. Hell or High Watermelon, however, beats that rap and is exceptionally good to drink on a hot day. It’s en excellent beach beer, let me tell you.

Flying Dog Snake Dog IPA

Coming in at a little over 7% ABV, this beer packs a bit of a wallop. It’s got some hop bitterness to it, paired with some decent grainy flavors, but it’s an incredibly smooth drinking beer in spite of the alcohol content. If you like your IPAs with a punch of flavor, this is a great choice for sunset on the back patio.

Bell’s Oberon Ale

A wheat ale with a little sourdough funk and some light notes of fruit, Oberon is a great go-to for a wheat ale with some character (and comes highly recommended by my friend, M). It has a fairly light body and some decent carbonation (though not too much), which keeps it feeling nice and refreshing. It’s got enough flavor to stand up to food, so try it while grilling or chowing down.

Anderson Valley Briney Melon Gose

I think you all know where I stand on gose beers. This is a personal favorite (though Anderson Valley makes at least two others that are fantastic) as it’s tart, faintly salty, and incredibly bright. It’s a very easy beer to drink, as long as you like the decent sour punch, and is perfect for hot weather.

Union Craft Brewing Anthem

As a celebration of the recent 200th anniversary of the penning of the Star Spangled Banner, this Baltimore brewery whipped up a golden ale to delight the senses. With a decently grainy base and a Mosaic hop finish, this pairs great with the classic American grilled goods that we so love in summer.