Review: Stillwater Artisanal Classique

The last time that I had a Stillwater Artisanal brew, it was from a bomber that I bought while in Portland, Oregon. That’s a little far to have traveled for a local beer. So, close to home again, I picked up another of their beers. And, I have to state the obvious here: their label art is always eye catching to me. It’s great design work.

Classique – which calls itself a Post-Modern Beer, but, let’s be honest here, is a farmhouse or a saison – pours a beautiful golden color that looks slightly hazy to me. There’s two generous fingers of fluffy, white head that falls pretty quickly after pouring the beer out into a pint glass. I didn’t see any lacing on this one. While pouring, I get a big, biscuit nose and some yeast funk from this. With a deep sniff, nose in the glass and everything, there are even some lingering notes of tropical fruit and a whiff of some malted grains as well.

Stillwater Artisanal Classique 005

The taste is bigly yeast funk right up front. It’s light and kind of dry with something that makes me think of pink peppercorns. There’s even a light lemon tartness there. Toward the end, there’s a kind of “heat” sensation that I often get from Belgians. The mouthfeel is pretty light, with decent carbonation. It’s crisp and drinkable in general, but there’s this dryness in the back of my throat that I don’t love. Not bad, not great. I don’t think I’d buy this again, though. 3 mugs out of 5.

3 Mugs

Review: 21st Amendment Brewery Brew Free Or Die IPA

Oh, nothing. Just hanging out on a Christmas Eve and making caramel sauce. Like you do.

21st-amendment-brew-free-or-die-004

While babysitting a pot full of molten sugar, I decided to grab a brew from my fridge. I had a single can (yes, a can! let’s talk about cans!) of this in the fridge and cracked that bad boy open. Some people turn their noses up at canned beer, but I have never had the problem of my canned tasting tinny or off. What’s great about cans is that they are air-tight and allow no light through – so no skunked beer! Plus, cans weigh less so they’re easier to transport, making for a smaller carbon footprint in the end.

This IPA pours a deep honey golden color – maybe a little cloudy – with a sturdy white head that slowly sinks. The nose is fresh, with an emphasis on floral hops all the way. There’s a hint of citrus, too, I could swear. It’s green, even. Piney maybe.

21st-amendment-brew-free-or-die-003

The first taste is sweet, surprisingly sweet, with malt and caramel flavors with a background note of piney hops. This is a bold, west coast style IPA for sure. Those piney hops really do it. There’s a drier finish to it that is sharp without being unpleasant.

 

Review: Against The Grain Citra Ass Down IPA

Maybe it’s a little odd that I went to Oregon, seeking local beers, and ended up buying one from Louisville, KY. But hey, weird things happen… and my beer selections during this Portland trip continue to get weird.

against-the-grain-citra-ass-down-001

Ciara Ass Down by Against the Grain brewery is a double IPA that comes in a can. When I saw the name of it as I browsed the beer selection at Belmont Station, I giggled to myself and moved on. But then I doubled back to that beer and decided to give it a go. I’ve learned from some experimental, small-batch, single-hopped beers that I really like the flavor profile of Citra hops.

against-the-grain-citra-ass-down-007

Ciara hops are a relatively new varietal on the market. Introduced in 2008, they are a hybrid of a number of different hops. They’re very strongly citrusy and tropical in taste.

Poured from the can to a pint glass, Citra Ass Down was a beautiful medium golden yellow color with a delicate light tan head that dissipate quickly, leaving some lacing behind. It had no strong nose that I could detect, maybe because it was quite cold when I poured it. It was floral and sweet, with the Citra hops standing front and center, as they should be.

against-the-grain-citra-ass-down-004

It’s a Double IPA, so it had a higher ABV than a lot of the other beers I’d been drinking. At 8.2%, it was very easy to drink, which is maybe its great danger. The Citra hops keep the taste light and never too sweet and heavy like some DIPAs. I have to say, though, from experience: this beer does not pair well with candy corn.

against-the-grain-citra-ass-down-006

But then, what does? I spent Halloween night sipping on Citra Ass Down and watching old episodes of Nickelodeon’s Are You Afraid of the Dark? together with my friends – a really perfect way to spend some time.

Review: GoodLife Descender IPA

We’re always supposed to try new things, right? Well, I’m in Portland, OR, visiting friends for a while, and I found myself in the store, shopping for dinner ingredients and beer.

“Try something you’re never even heard of!” said the little beer conscience in the back of my head.

And I listened. And I grabbed a six-pack of IPAs from GoodLife Brewing.

good-life-descender-ipa-008

Good Life, it turns out, is fairly local to where I am now. They’re based out of Bend, Oregon, a charming ski-resort town in central Oregon. I actually visited Bend about a year and a half ago, with these same friends, for a brewery-hopping weekend adventure. Maybe that’s why Good Life spoke to me; maybe I did remember hearing of it somewhere in my distant memory.

Bend has a really incredible beer and brewing culture for a relatively small town in the middle of nowhere. There’s a strong drive to brew and drink locally here in Oregon (really, locally grown anything is a big hit here) and Bend makes that easy, with 22 breweries all packed in together. I think we hit seven or eight during our two days there.

good-life-descender-ipa-003

GoodLife Brewing was founded in 2011 near the Deschutes river (yes, Deschutes is also a Bend brewery), making crisp, clean water an easy-to-acquire ingredient for them. They actually can their beer, not bottle it, which is sometimes still a controversial choice in brewing circles. I got my six-pack for about $9 (which is way better than the beer prices back home!).

good-life-descender-ipa-004

I poured from the 12oz can into a pint glass. The color is a pale amber and the head formed nicely (although, in hindsight, I may have been a little overzealous with my pour), with some good lacing to follow. It has a nose of something fresh and bright and green with hints of floral notes. I have drank it from the can as well as from a glass and the scents really open up the open environment of a pint glass, though it tastes just fine from a can as well. It’s better colder, which I learned when I drank my first one after the cans had been in my grocery store and car for a while and had lost their proper chill.

good-life-descender-ipa-005

It’s a very crisp IPA in the NW style. Very West Coast all around. It’s got some hints of citrus but it never crosses into “fruity” territory. It’s not even as floral or green tasting as the nose would suggest. Not that it lacks flavor – it’s balanced well with a little toastiness from the malt (look at that color) and has a slight bitterness from the hops (the varietal(s) don’t seem to be public knowledge) and is well-rounded overall.

good-life-descender-ipa-009

I enjoyed one while prepping and cooking a dinner of soy/honey/red pepper marinated pork chops, roasted brussels sprouts with onions, green beans, roasted carrots, and roasted sweet potatoes.

Look, when it comes to making dinner for friends, I do not mess around. 

I had a second Descender IPA along with dinner and it stood up to the saltiness of the marinated pork chops, so I was pleased (and they were a bit salty – I can admit my faults!). I think that, at this point in my stay here, I only have one of these beers left. I promise that I will cherish it and drink it lovingly and with a pure heart.