Beer Review: 21st Amendment Down to Earth Session IPA

It sure gets dark early these days. Personally, I hate it. But nothing can soothe the stress of a dark, rainy, trafficky commute home like enjoying a beer while I make dinner. And this one should be pretty easy-drinking, so I have high hopes for an overall nice experience.

21st Amendment Down to Earth is a pretty marigold color, going from can to pint glass in my kitchen. It looks heavily carbonated from all of the bubbly activity going on in there. There’s perhaps one finger of fluffy, off-white foam that’s fairly ephemeral. I get a big nose of fresh, green hops with hints of something fruit and citrusy like orange or pineapple. There’s lots to smell here and I hope this beer delivers on taste.

There’s some decent flavor going on in this session IPA! It’s bright and tropical with some grassy notes from the hops. It’s exceedingly refreshing and not dank at all. This really is an easy drinking beer and I could imagine a nicer, sunnier, warmer afternoon with two or three of these highly crushable 4.4% beers to enjoy while watching the sun set. This would be a great spring or summer beer, yet here we are, stuck in late fall. It’s fairly carbonate, but it suits the beer style.

I loved this and I’d buy and sip a few of these all afternoon. Five out of five frosty, relaxing mugs.

Beer Review: Brookeville Beer Farm Hugelkultur

I love this time of year, when it’s finally properly fall. Crunchy leaves, crisp, cold air, pumpkin-flavored everything, and festbier. My favorites. With a weird, waffling warm/cool fall here in the mid-Atlantic, I was worried that autumn would never show up. I decided to honor fall by having a brew at Beers and Cheers Too in Gaithersburg after work one fine Thursday. Now, do I know why this beer was named after a method of raised-bed farming? I do not. But I did enjoy it

This beer by Brookeville Beer Farm pours a lovely, saturated amber color, through which plenty of light passes. There’s some cream-looking off-white head that leaves a cute little cap on the beer for several minutes before finally dissipating. There’s really no lacing to speak of here. There is, however, plenty of malt on the nose. It’s rich and sweet and smells almost caramel or brown sugary. From this smell, I’m expecting something rather sweet.

The taste  is great, malty, full of flavor – but not actually very sweet at all. This is on the darker, roastier, fuller-bodied end of what festbiers are. Many festbiers are really just Vienna lagers in style (but not brewed in Vienna, so they don’t really take on that moniker). Unlike many of its brethren, this beer packs a lot of flavor. There’s hints of caramel or burnt sugar in here that are really lovely.  It’s not at all bitter and is exceedingly drinkable with lots of flavor. It’s a very approachable beer.

I love this beer and would seek it out again. Brookeville Beer Farm seems to be churning out a lot of winners in my book. Five out of five mugs!

Beer Review: Burley Oak Sorry Chicky

A friend was kind enough to lend me a book that I’m pretty excited about: From a Certain Point of View. It’s a collection of 40 short stories/character pieces to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Star Wars Episode IV: A New  Hope. It’s a nice, quiet evening at home with birds, books, and beer (my fav!) and a chance to reflect on the transformative power of stories. There’s hardly a better way to relax, if you ask me.

I opted for a can of Burley Oak‘s Sorry Chicky, which is a dry hopped sour ale that I picked up from Total Wine in Laurel. I’m very jazzed about the sound of this beer because when am I ever not excited about a sour beer?

It pours a rich straw gold  that looks awfully carbonated at a glance, which might just make for a very fun sour to drink. There’s no head, just a thin trace of foam that vanishes in less than a minute. It smells very richly sour with a real punch that will hopefully cause a bit of puckering. But it’s a complex smell that isn’t just bright and citrusy; there’s almost something earthy and spicy in the nose here. And maybe even a sweet melt backbone at work here? I have to dig in.

And whoa! It’s very sour and in your face! What a wallop!

But then there’s that unpleasant sort of cheerio taste that indicates that it’s a flawed sour most likely made with Brettanomyces. This beer is not at all enjoyable to me because of that wheaty cereal aftertaste. Now, does it pack a pucker punch? Yes. It does that right. It’s ambitious and unusual and I salute the creativity, but I feel like it wasn’t well-executed.

Two out of five mugs. I would not buy this again unless I heard that they changed their recipe.

Beer Review: Southern Tier Pumpking

Look, I warned you that I like pumpkin beers. Get ready to read about a lot of them for a long, long time! I have fond memories of this beer, but it’s not really official until I review it here on Beerily Thus, right? Right. This is, luckily, not one of those unpleasant, tinny pumpkin ales. This is a robust pumpkin beer with lots to offer!

I had a 6oz of this at Beers and Cheers Too in Gaithersburg because even though I’d had a stressful Monday at work, it wasn’t so stressful that I felt like I needed twelve-to-sixteen ounces of an 8.6% ABV beer in the afternoon. Taako’s good out here.

Southern Tier Pumpking is a beautiful marigold color, which is appropriately autumnal in appearance. There’s a thin, pure white head with a little lacing, but this is an Imperial Ale and a lot of head isn’t necessarily something to expect. The clinginess of the lacing is likely due to a somewhat high sugar content; I remember this being a fairly sweet-tasting beer. It smells very warm, sort of peppercorny, but I’d bet that’s the allspice that I’m getting.

The first sip is alive with sweetness, warm spices, and rich pumpkin flavor. This is more like liquid pumpkin cake than many of its lackluster pumpkin beer cousins. It warms my tongue and the back of my throat. The taste of the spice blend stays on my tongue for a minute or two of quiet contemplation (I am of course meditating on how darn good pumpkin beers can be). It’s very easy to drink, which is dangerous because of that aforementioned high ABV. Enjoy, but watch out for it. It’ll bite you.

This is a seasonal treat that I look forward to every year and time hasn’t change that one bit. It’s as good as I remember, if not better. Five out of five, I’ll drink this for as long as I can find it.

 

Beer Review: Abita Turbodog Brown Ale

Some things in life are very important to me: these include: dressing up for the Renaissance Festival, dressing up for Halloween, and beer. Lucky for me, I can combine all three of these things right here, right now. I donned the pirate ensemble I made for RennFest this year both for my office and for Trick or Treaters. I love how the dress/coat turned out!

As it got dark and more of them came out, I decided to level up my pirateness by getting out my mug, which I use at the RennFest as well as whenever I play or run tabletop games. Let me tell you what, this thing keeps cold beers mighty cold!

I wasn’t in the mood for anything with bite or fruit taste to it. Luckily, I had grabbed an Abita Turbodog in my last make-your-own-six-pack run to Total Wine in Laurel. This brown ale would be my Halloween beer! It poured out with a ton of off-white, creamy, fluffy head. The nose was a true brown ale with lots of malt and a little burnt sugar or caramel in there. It took a few minutes for that head to settle down before I could drink it.

The first sip is flavorful, not really sweet… but there was something tinny about it. Something metallic. And, yes, it’s the beer and not my long-proven mug – my first sip was even from the bottle. I’m not sure I love that imperfection that’s at work here. There’s a slight aftertaste of cinnamon or maybe apple. It’s autumnal and pleasant, but I can’t get past the metallic hint. It really ruins the whole thing.

I’m not sure if this was a flaw in the batch or if this is true to this brew, but I’m hesitant to buy this beer again because of that flaw. Two out of five, I think I’ll pass on it in the future.

 

Beer Review: Peabody Heights Mr. Trash Wheel’s Lost Python Ale

I learned something today. In Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, there is a large trash-collecting water wheel vessel, featuring big cartoon eyes to give his dirty work a charming appearance. His name, it turns out, is Mr. Trash Wheel. I appreciate the directness in that. I’ve never seen him in person, but maybe I need to change that. Peabody Heights says that a portion of the proceeds from this beer go toward keeping the harbor clean, which is something I can get behind. Beer and cleaner waterways? Yes, please!

There’s still more to this tale. Because of course there is. Because Baltimore has to be a weird sort of place. The second part of the name? The Lost Python Ale? That’s a nod to a five-foot-long African ball python  that found its way onto the water wheel a few years ago.

Truth really is stranger than fiction.

This is in the style of a session ale and when I got the pint at Beers and Cheers Too, there wasn’t much of a nose going on. There’s something slightly tropical and a little bit vibrant, not really hoppy- or dank-smelling. There are also maybe some notes of orange zest in a very spring or summer fashion, making it an odd beer choice for the first day of fall. It’s a beautiful marigold color that’s bright and clear in a pint glass covered in condensation on a humid, warm September day.

Right away, there’s a nice burst of flavor – juicy and bold, but not sweet or excessively fruity. There’s plenty of bright hop flavors and just the right amount of dryness on the back end of this beer. It’s tropical, but not sweet, I am sure, thanks to the Mosaic hops. They’re a goldmine of bold flavors and a wonder of modern hop farming.

This beer is supremely easy-drinking, but never exactly mellow; it’s so flavorful! The dry sensation is mild and well-balanced with this flavor punch. Five out of five from me.

Beer Review: Captain Lawrence Powder Dreams IPA

On a warm and bright day, I required an equally bright beer. It was surprisingly hot, honestly, given that this was basically fall at this point – and humid, too. Weather like that calls for something exceptionally refreshing.

Enter Captain Lawrence Powder Dreams IPA. I’ve had good experiences with New York-based Captain Lawrence before (Barrel Select Green, I think) and this sounded like just the craft brew to make my evening at Frisco Tap House complete.

Because this is a precious, carefully crafted beer, it was sold to me in a smaller sized goblet (not my favorite way to drink a beer – I don’t personally prefer this unwieldy and heavy vessel) at a higher price, but I was willing to go for it. The taster that I’d tried had really impressed me.

Through the thick walls of the glass goblet, the beer is a light and bright yellow color with slightly orange undertones. It looks hazy to me and there’s a tiny smear of white head in this wide-mouthed and thick-walled monstrosity of a glass. Right away, it smells very tropical and juicy, backed up with the promise of plenty of pine resin. The scent is bright, yet earthy. It’s a real powerhouse of aroma.

There’s a flavorful punch of orange and mango that is immediately chased down by a faintly spicy earthiness that’s almost reminiscent of an herbal tea. I say this partly because of the dry finish (a little drier than I’d like), but for this much flavor in every sip, that’s a trade off that I’m willing to make. There is perhaps too much resin and dryness to be considered easy drinking in my opinion, but it’s still a joy to taste.

Despite the higher price tag, I’d absolutely order this again in a heartbeat. Five out of five, easily.

 

Beer Review: Mendocino Brewing Co Red Tail Ale

Two friends are about to get married and I couldn’t be more excited. Although it was not on purpose, I still like to take credit for having introduced them. I met one in a writing group and dragged the other to it and they hit it off right away. Now, they’re getting hitched! They’ve asked me to be in the wedding, give some speeches, and even make some very minor alterations on the bride’s gown. For love, I’m more than happy to help.

This will be a picnic wedding, potluck style, so I’m bringing some of the stuff for a charcuterie plate (though there will also be a mini fonude pot because my friends and I are nothing if not ambitious). One thing I’m cooking off is some pork and apple sausage made at a local buthcer shop. It smells amazing. While a work, there’s nothing like a beer to keep me company.

To celebrate one union (my friends), I’ll opt in for another: birds and beer (two of my favs). Poured from a bottle into a pint glass, this rich, honeyed brown beer is just a touch hazy looking to me. Though there is an extremely minimal head, there’s a bit of a dusting of foam that dissipates in about a minute. The smell is sweet and raisin-like, which must come down to the malts in this beer as it’s only 6% ABV. There’s no hops smell at all – I get nothing but malt (but not the roasty kind), all sweet amber brown scents.

The first taste is as sweet as is to be expected. There’s not a lot of depth here, flavor-wise, and it’s a little watery-tasting or thin to me. There aren’t layers of flavor at work here. It’s malty, it’s brown, it’s sweet. That’s really it. I feel like the carbonation is a little high for what this is trying to be. There’s actually something slightly acidic and off about it to me.

I bought a six pack and I’ll probably drink them, but I doubt I’d buy this again. Two out of five. No thanks.

Beer Review : Atlas Brew Works Ponzi IPA

New-to-me DC-based Atlas Brew Works is, I can tell, a brewery that I will be going back to for more interesting pints. I like to drink local when I can and, while it’s not a guarantee of quality (everything in life is a mixed bag), keeping in a small geographical area can get you to try things you might have otherwise overlooked.

I pulled up a stool at Beers and Cheers Too in Gaithersburg and stared down their sizable beer list. Ponzi was described as being “criminally hoppy” which is sort of my equivalent of “you had me at ‘hello.'” I ordered up a pint and settled in.

I could smell this beer when the waitress set it down on the bar about a foot away from me – big biscuit and wheat smells wafted over to me along with some herbal hops. This IPA pours a rich straw gold color that’s fairly clear in a frosty pint glass. There’s a nice, fluffy, slow-to-fall white head made up of a fine matrix of bubbles. A close-up sniff gives me more citrus notes to go along with the initial hop-forward smell.

The taste is a big, west coast punch of flavor. The male (Munich) is light, yet flavorful and the hops cover a wide range of tastes from bright green on through dank. The finish is dry, yet very balanced. And there’s a sweetness here that reminds me of milk stouts and that made me wonder if there was any lactose added to this brew. The description that Atlas gives doesn’t mention it specifically, but there’s something going on with the malts here that is a little bit brown sugary.

There’s a whole garden full of hop varietals in here: Cascade, Chinook, Centential, Mandarina, and Ahtamun. Just bring the whole crew, why don’t you?

The nose on this beer promised big flavor and the taste delivered. I thoroughly enjoyed this and would definitely order it again. Five delicious mugs out of five.

Beer Review: Founders All Day IPA

To acquire this beer, I took a walk to my corner store during which I got street harassed and followed in my own neighborhood and then was rained on in a sudden sundering of the sky by a thunderstorm. Honestly, this beer better be really good after all of that. Let’s find out!

This 4.7% ABV IPA (a little beyond a session, I would say). It’s a beautiful color like a rich, amber honey gold. There’s a handsome, fluffy, active head that hangs around for about a minute. It leaves a smear of foam and some pretty sticky lacing behind. It’s almost malty-sweet smelling to me, which I’m surprised by. There should be a lot of forest resin going on in this beer. I’m expecting a decent punch of flavor punch based on the nose of this beer.

The taste up front is a little bit dry, but it absolutely does deliver on those resinous hop flavors that the smell promised me. There is definitely a sweet note to it from the malts that I was smelling before. There’s a lot going on in this beer and I’m really enjoying the layers of flavor. It’s both sweet and dry, and very slightly bitter. I’d say it’s very well-balanced overall.

This beer has a fairly light body with some moderate combination. It’s extremely easy to drink and very refreshing. I give it five mugs, even in spite of the bitterness.