Beer Review: Southern Tier Old Man Winter

It never got above freezing today (and hasn’t for over a week now) and the wind is whipping something fierce. As a hater of the cold even on a good day, I was pretty properly miserable on my drive home, during which I had to stop and gas up my car. Shivering in a coat, hat, and gloves isn’t really my favorite thing. When I got home, I desperately needed something cozy to help me warm up.

Enter Southern Tier Old Man Winter, some manchego and salami, and some episodes of Critical Role (a D&D actual play stream, which I love, and which I am sadly almost caught up on – just in time for their new season). This is the kind of comfort that I needed this day.

Old Man Winter pours a handsome brunette color with a light cream colored, fine, smooth head that’s about one finger tall at its fullest. The head falls quickly enough, but leaves a bit of lacing behind when it does. It’s a good-looking beer. It smells warming to me, like brown sugar or honey. I’m not detecting any spices, but there is some depth and some richness to the malt profile.

The first taste is a little like a scotch ale and there’s some alcoholic heat to this. It’s 7.5%, so that’s no real surprise. It’s very balanced, inviting, rich, and just a hair sweet. Nice clean finish without any problematic dryness. It’s roasty like dark cocoa or maybe a touch of coffee – something just a hair bitter, but again, balanced.

A really enjoyable sipping beer for a winter’s night. Five out of five, and I’m so glad I bought a six pack to enjoy.

Beer Review: Stone Brewing Stochasticity Project Grainiac

Stochasticity (n)

The quality of lacking any predictable order or plan.

If we can intuit anything at all about a brewery as successful as Stone, I don’t imagine that chance has much to do with anything. Their line of small batch, experimental brews has been given a name that means happenstance or dumb luck, but they’re clearly the result of anything but.

Grainiac, a member of the Stochasticity Project from Stone Brewing, is “a multigrain ale dry-hopped with Cascade and Centennial.” It uses nine different grains (including some unusual ones like millet and buckwheat), so between that and the dry-hopping, this is bound to be a real powerhouse of flavor.

Poured from a bomber into a glass, Grainiac is a refined, deep brown amber, filled with warm hues. There’s a tan head that’s about two fingers tall, made from fine foam. It leaves behind a bit of clingy lacing inside of the glass. The first smell I get is an alcoholic heat, mixed with those rich brown sugar and maple notes that higher ABV beers tend to have. This is 8.5%, which is hig though not insane by any means, but I also know I’m not finishing a whole bomber by myself on a weeknight. This would be inadvisable, though likely delicious. The scent reminds me of a rich amber or brown ale, with deep notes of stone fruit and honey or brown sugar.

The taste is full of grains (obviously) and a lot of malt flavor, with a huge punch of complex tastes. There’s a pleasantly dry finish from the dry-hopping process. Additions of hops in the latter part of the brewing process (originally used to stave off putrefaction around the 12th century) give a mild bitter flavor to beer, which is very in demand in today’s IPA-rich market. This is a beautiful beer, wonderful for sipping, and there’s an awful lot going on here. Notes or rye or dark bread, rich honey and maple, apricot or plum, and a note of wheatiness at the end all come together in harmony. It’s not too dry, but the sweetness does not linger on the tongue, which is great because it could very easily be cloying in nature.

What a great beer! With an ABV like that, I’d buy it again, but certainly plan on splitting it with someone. Five out of five.

 

Beer Review: New Belgium Fat Tire

New year, old beer. New Belgium is, if you ask me, a great success story for craft beer. They distribute to all 50 states and some countries and their beers have become widely available, even in sports bars that aren’t necessarily going to have a good beer selection. In the old days, you’d go to So and So’s Sports Bar and the best you could hope for, beer-wise, was Yuengling. Let us not return to those dark days, please.

This beer is a lovely, deep orange color with a small cream-colored head, which does vanish fairly quickly. Right out of the gate, it smells like a Belgian: wheat and caramel and some slightly clove-scented funkiness. New Belgium’s house ale yeast is designed to be slightly fruity in nature, creating a decent doppleganger of traditional Belgian flavor profiles.

The taste is very smooth, extremely balanced, and just a tad sweet. There’s no overwhelming spice to this, but it has just a hint of that banana flavor that Belgians so often rock. It has the malty notes of an amber ale, though nothing quite so rich as a brown ale. It has enough flavor that it can stand up to salty snacks or food. It works well with big flavor, and it’s no shrinking violet.

This is a great tasting beer that’s relatively easy to find just about anywhere. It’s one of the great success stories of craft brewing distribution, a real Cinderella tale. I love this beer for its careful flavor balance and will often seek it out. Five out of five frosty mugs.