Beer Review: Flying Dog K-9 Cruiser Winter Ale

It was a cold and exceptionally windy night and we haven’t had a whole ton of those yet this season, so I guess we were overdue. This outing to Frisco Taphouse before my writing critique group absolutely called for something warm and cozy and winter appropriate. Why, something at around 7% and on cask sounds like it’ll hit the spot. And with “winter” in the name, how could I go wrong?

In a rare stroke of luck, this pour killed their cask a little shy of a full pint, so they were kind enough to put the drink on the house. Frisco is a good place in my mind and this is just another tick in the Why They’re Awesome column for me. I was happy to take my lucky beer and enjoy it.

It’s a handsome, deep brown hue with hints of ruddiness where light struggled to pass through at the outer edges of the glass. I imagine the head on this beer is all wrong because it was the end of a cask, so it seems silly to try to reflect on what the head is supposed to be like on this one. There are no spices in the nose, which I found a little surprising as that’s common in a lot of winter beers. There’s a strong scent of roasted malts, though, which I’m usually. Flying Dog K-9 Cruiser Winter Ale is apparently brewed with cardamom and vanilla, but I’m not smelling any of that – it just seems like a standard porter at a glance.

The taste is dry and has some richness that makes me thing of Scotch ale, but it’s not at all sweet. Not even a little bit. It’s cozy enough for winter, but it is also overwhelmingly dry to my palate. There’s some bitterness at work here that I’m finding very unappealing. I guess I’m doubly lucky that this was on the house since I’m not really loving it. It reads more like a disappointing porter to me than a winter ale.

It was fine, sure, but not at all what I was expecting and not something I will buy again. Just two out of five.

 

Beer Review: Tall Tales Blue Ox

Sometimes, we have to try new things! I was angling for somewhere near my office that I hadn’t been yet – somewhere I could enjoy a variety of craft beers after work – and where I could also enjoy a snack before a late dinner that night. Enter Old Town Pour House in Gaithersburg, MD. With over 90 craft brews on tap, you know I’m here for that. Plus, they do small 6oz pours, which is my preferred method of beer consumption most of the time.

This beer, on their limited menu, had me at the description of a blueberry stout with coffee and chocolate notes. I had to try it. It sounded like it could be great or really iffy. Adventure, excitement – a Jedi craves not these things. But a gamble on a tasty beer? Just maybe.

For $4, I got my teensy glass of 6.8% ABV Blue Ox and I threw in some $7 fried cheese curds with smoked tomato coulis, so chalk another one up to Team Adventure. The coulis is strange and I keep trying to decide if the smoke flavor is too much, too acrid, but then I go ahead and just dunk the next cheese curd and the next, so I guess it’s a winner in my book.

The beer is a deep, dark mahogany with a little over one finger of sturdy, tan head. It smells like dry, roasted malt and even a little like toasted bread – and, trailing behind that, is the faint smell of blueberry that reminds me of a fresh baked pie. I can’t wait to try this.

The first sip is simply fantastic. A slight roasted cocoa flavor, immediately followed by a bright, nut not overwhelming blueberry taste hits me – it’s got plenty of layers, but it’s not sweet or too much of a punch. It’s really delightful all around. It finishes on the tongue with more dry, roasted coffee and malt flavors. There’s a nice, clean finish that is pleasantly dry, as a stout ought to be.

This is a really beautiful little beer and I would definitely seek it out again any time of year. Five out of five mugs for me.

Beer Review: Elysian Night Owl Pumpkin Owl

If you ask me, it’s never too late in the season for pumpkin beers! I believe I have made my love for them rather apparent by now. After work one Monday, I wanted to grab a six pack of something new to me and so I stopped in to Beers and Cheers Too (which is so convenient to my office). While I was there, I also decided to treat myself to a little something – and that something happened to be Elysian’s Night Owl Pumpkin Ale.

Now, I’ve had some of Elysian’s other pumpkin beers before and adored them, but I was pretty sure I hadn’t had Night Owl before. If you ask me, Elysian are some of the very best pumpkin beer brewers out there, so I wasn’t going to pass up this opportunity to taste another one of their creations.

For $3 at happy hour, I grabbed a 6oz pour of Night Owl. It’s a lovely golden amber color with not quite one finger of off-white creamy head. This falls in about a minute and mostly disappears, leaving a white smear behind, in about two minutes. It leaves behind some pretty sturdy lacing as I drink it down. It smells very pumpkiny right off the bat even as I’m snapping pictures. There’s a slightly spicy smell, but the most prominent note is the gourd itself – slightly vegetabley and a little bit sweet with hints of brown sugar on the nose. There’s maybe a whiff of yeasty or malty funk mingling.

The nose is accurate; there’s a little ginger or clove in here for sure, but this beer is legitimately pumpkin-forward, which is rare. Usually these poor beers get strangled with spices. I’ve had an aggressively cinnamony pumpkin beer from them in the past (I wish I could remember the name, it was a few years ago) which was delicious, but it masked the pumpkin taste. This beer plays very nicely with the natural autumnal produce that it’s showcasing.

Five out of five frosty mugs of pumpkiny goodness.

Beer Review: 21st Amendment Down to Earth Session IPA

It sure gets dark early these days. Personally, I hate it. But nothing can soothe the stress of a dark, rainy, trafficky commute home like enjoying a beer while I make dinner. And this one should be pretty easy-drinking, so I have high hopes for an overall nice experience.

21st Amendment Down to Earth is a pretty marigold color, going from can to pint glass in my kitchen. It looks heavily carbonated from all of the bubbly activity going on in there. There’s perhaps one finger of fluffy, off-white foam that’s fairly ephemeral. I get a big nose of fresh, green hops with hints of something fruit and citrusy like orange or pineapple. There’s lots to smell here and I hope this beer delivers on taste.

There’s some decent flavor going on in this session IPA! It’s bright and tropical with some grassy notes from the hops. It’s exceedingly refreshing and not dank at all. This really is an easy drinking beer and I could imagine a nicer, sunnier, warmer afternoon with two or three of these highly crushable 4.4% beers to enjoy while watching the sun set. This would be a great spring or summer beer, yet here we are, stuck in late fall. It’s fairly carbonate, but it suits the beer style.

I loved this and I’d buy and sip a few of these all afternoon. Five out of five frosty, relaxing mugs.

Beer Review: Brookeville Beer Farm Hugelkultur

I love this time of year, when it’s finally properly fall. Crunchy leaves, crisp, cold air, pumpkin-flavored everything, and festbier. My favorites. With a weird, waffling warm/cool fall here in the mid-Atlantic, I was worried that autumn would never show up. I decided to honor fall by having a brew at Beers and Cheers Too in Gaithersburg after work one fine Thursday. Now, do I know why this beer was named after a method of raised-bed farming? I do not. But I did enjoy it

This beer by Brookeville Beer Farm pours a lovely, saturated amber color, through which plenty of light passes. There’s some cream-looking off-white head that leaves a cute little cap on the beer for several minutes before finally dissipating. There’s really no lacing to speak of here. There is, however, plenty of malt on the nose. It’s rich and sweet and smells almost caramel or brown sugary. From this smell, I’m expecting something rather sweet.

The taste  is great, malty, full of flavor – but not actually very sweet at all. This is on the darker, roastier, fuller-bodied end of what festbiers are. Many festbiers are really just Vienna lagers in style (but not brewed in Vienna, so they don’t really take on that moniker). Unlike many of its brethren, this beer packs a lot of flavor. There’s hints of caramel or burnt sugar in here that are really lovely.  It’s not at all bitter and is exceedingly drinkable with lots of flavor. It’s a very approachable beer.

I love this beer and would seek it out again. Brookeville Beer Farm seems to be churning out a lot of winners in my book. Five out of five mugs!